News & Media

May 07, 2015


A UCSB symposium features cutting-edge developments in molecular and cellular approaches to understanding brain structure and function.

Montell organized “Molecular and Cellular Breakthroughs in Systems Neuroscience” with Kosik, the Harriman Professor of Neuroscience. The symposium was designed to showcase the kind of cutting-edge neuroscience research being conducted at UCSB and at other research institutions around the state.

November 12, 2014

Landmark experiments with model organisms such as mice have shown that infectious pathogens can disrupt the “normal” microbiome, but the extent to which this process shapes symbiotic microbial communities during disease outbreaks in nature is largely unknown. This new work, conducted by Andrea Jani, a UCSB graduate student in Cherie Briggs’ lab in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology (EEMB), addresses a fundamental gap in disease ecology and microbiome research.

October 28, 2014

A biomedical scientist at UC Santa Barbara may have a hand in reversing both those trends, thanks to his novel therapeutic approach and a big new grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Jamey Marth, director of UCSB’s Center for Nanomedicine (CNM) and a professor of the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, has been awarded $3.5 million from the NIH Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for his continued work to boost survival rates in sepsis.

October 06, 2014

MCDB’s Denise Montell is the recipient of a 2014 Pioneer Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The annual award recognizes a select group of scientists whose bold and innovative “pioneering” approaches have the potential to make an unusually high impact on a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. Montell, the Duggan Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, and her research team at UCSB define and solve fundamental questions in cell and developmental biology using fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) genetics, mammalian cell culture and state-of-the-art imaging approaches. Her team and their collaborators recently discovered a surprising reversibility of the cell suicide process known as apoptosis. Cells that have progressed beyond steps previously considered to be points of no return can reverse the dying process, recover and go on to proliferate. Depending on the circumstances, this has the potential for significant consequences, both positive and negative.

August 19, 2014

UCSB played an important role in revealing how illness-linked genetic variation affects neurons. Scientific consensus holds that most major mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, are genetically rooted diseases of synapses, the connections between neurons in the brain. Now research has demonstrated how a rare mutation in a suspect gene corrupts the on-off switches of dozens of other genes underlying these connections.

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